Friday, May 14, 2021

Fact Check

Why some gas stations are advertising $9.99 unleaded

If Your Time is shortGas stations will put $9.99 on their signs to indicate that they’re out of gas, not that they’re selling it...

Tucker Carlson Misrepresents Vaccine Safety Reporting Data

SciCheck Digest The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System accepts any reports of adverse side effects following vaccination to help regulators detect potential problems. Anyone can submit...

No, this isn’t a real Exxon gas station sign

If Your Time is shortThis image was fabricated online.See the sources for this fact-checkGasoline shortages are affecting some gas stations around the country and...

Magnet Videos Refuel Bogus Claim of Vaccine Microchips

SciCheck Digest The ingredients in the COVID-19 vaccines authorized for use in the U.S. are publicly available. Yet a false claim that the vaccines contain...

Misinformation surges amid India’s COVID-19 calamity

NEW DELHI (AP) — The man in the WhatsApp video says he has seen it work himself: A few drops of lemon juice in...

No, this isn’t a photo of South Carolinians who filled plastic bags with gas

If Your Time is shortA photo of plastic bags filled with gas is from a 2019 arrest in Mexico, not the United States in...

US Politics
Latest

Biden courts Hill leaders, but GOP won’t budge on big deal

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite sharing pleasantries at the White House, Republican congressional leaders signaled no willingness Wednesday to embrace President Joe Biden’s ideas for...

Stefanik voted in as House GOP’s new No. 3 leader

After the vote concluded, Stefanik walked to speak to reporters with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy and other members of the leadership team by...

Jenner’s claim she didn’t vote at odds with LA county record

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Caitlyn Jenner wants to be governor of California but she took a pass on voting on some of the state’s...

Michigan Republican wants to register fact-checkers

LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan Republican known for challenging the results of the 2020 presidential election has turned his attention to those who...

Cicilline seeks to censure Republicans who dismiss Jan. 6 insurrection

He specifically pointed to recent comments made by GOP Reps. Andrew Clyde (Ga.), Jody Hice (Ga.) and Paul Gosar (Ariz.). The resolution may face...

LGBTQ

Ellen lashes out at “misogynistic” & “coordinated” attacks. She’s finished being kind. / LGBTQ Nation

Ellen DeGeneres at the 41st Annual People's Choice Awards held at the Nokia L.A. Live Theatre in Los Angeles on January 7, 2015.Photo: ShutterstockEllen...

Mother exorcises “foul spirits” from gay teen’s room in viral video / LGBTQ Nation

The gay teen's mom banishing Satan from her roomPhoto: Screenshot/TikTokA video of a Christian mother exorcising her gay daughter’s room has gone viral. “If you’re...

Is climate change an LGBTQ issue? Let’s find out on this week’s podcast. / LGBTQ Nation

The latest episode of the LGBTQ Nation podcast has arrived and we’re figuring out whether climate change is an LGBTQ issue. On this week’s episode, host...

Tech

EU to discuss US vaccine patent plan at Friday summit

BRUSSELS (AP) — European Union leaders said Thursday that in the wake of the U.S. backing patent waivers for COVID-19 vaccine technology, the 27-nation...

Streaming revenue boosts ViacomCBS Q1 results

ViacomCBS’s first-quarter net income beat expectations on strong streaming revenue during a quarter when the company aired the Super Bowl and introduced its rebranded...

Advocates sue to stop Tennessee Medicaid block grant program

Must read

Biden courts Hill leaders, but GOP won’t budge on big deal

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite sharing pleasantries at the White House, Republican congressional leaders signaled no willingness Wednesday to embrace President Joe Biden’s ideas for...

Virus Outbreak India

Virus Outbreak Indiahttps://apnews.com/article/india-health-coronavirus-pandemic-international-news-3122397d22774e488f5dc3c295f765e3Click to copyhttps://apnews.com/article/india-health-coronavirus-pandemic-international-news-3122397d22774e488f5dc3c295f765e3Click to copy Source link

Santa Fe County to exit regional coalition on national lab

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Santa Fe is the latest county to vote to withdraw from the Regional Coalition of Los Alamos National Laboratory...

Internal emails reveal WHO knew of sex abuse claims in Congo

BENI, Congo (AP) — When Shekinah was working as a nurse’s aide in northeastern Congo in January 2019, she said, a World Health Organization...

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A group of Tennessee Medicaid recipients has filed a lawsuit seeking to halt a plan that would make contentious changes to the state’s program designed to provide medical coverage to the poor.

According to the federal lawsuit filed this week in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, the Tennessee Justice Center — who is representing the recipients — claims the federal government under then-President Donald Trump exceeded its authority in approving the proposal. The complaint also argues Trump’s administration failed to provide enough time for the public to provide their feedback on the plan.

“Tennessee has a long history of mismanagement and bad Medicaid policy. Tennessee is the last state that should have an experimental waiver that puts vulnerable populations at risk,” said Michelle Johnson, executive director of the organization that regularly represents the state’s Medicaid recipients.

In Tennessee, the Medicaid program is called TennCare. It covers a limited group of about 1.5 million people, or about 22% of the state’s population, primarily low-income pregnant women, children up to age 21, the elderly and the disabled.

This week’s lawsuit comes after Republican Gov. Bill Lee declared in January that Tennessee had become the first state in the nation to be approved to receive funding in a lump sum for its Medicaid program through a block grant program. Trump’s administration signed off on the idea shortly before the former president left office.

The overhaul’s fate remains unclear under President Joe Biden. The Democrat who has opposed Medicaid block-grant efforts can rescind the change, but has not taken any action on it to date.

The U.S. Department of Justice, led by a new attorney general nominated by Biden, Merrick Garland, will have to decide how to respond to the challenge. Through a spokesperson, the department declined to comment on the lawsuit Friday.

Supporters had pushed for the idea, claiming that a block grant-style program would produce flexibility and savings inside TennCare that would then fuel additional health coverage offerings. Lee, and other supporters, said the new plan would do all of this without cutting benefits or eligibility.

Currently, the federal government pays a percentage of each state’s Medicaid costs, regardless of cost increases in any given year. For Tennessee, that means receiving approximately $7.5 billion in federal money for its $12.1 billion Medicaid program, or 66%.

Republicans argue the current system gives states little incentive to control expenses because no state pays more than half the total cost.

However, Democrats and health advocates have expressed concern that spending caps might cause states to purge their rolls or reduce services. They instead want to widen Medicaid eligibility.

The 65-page lawsuit argues the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services exceeded its statutory authority when it authorized the block grant program as an “experimental waiver.” The lawsuit describes the approval as “arbitrary and capricious and an abuse of discretion,” noting that the experiment received approval to be in place for 10 years.

The HHS agency did not immediately return a request for comment Friday.

“The (project) is not an experimental, pilot, or demonstration project, nor is it likely to promote the objectives of the Medicaid Act,” the suit claims.

TennCare officials disputed the criticism Friday, countering that the new changes will be a benefit to the state.

Under the block grant, if Tennessee’s rate of growth in expenditures is below the national trend, the state will receive a portion of the savings that it can reinvest in health initiatives.

“Seeking to vacate TennCare III’s approval only harms the very Tennesseans the organizations behind this lawsuit purport to advocate for,” the department said in a statement.

___

Associated Press writer Jonathan Mattise contributed to this report.

Source link

- Advertisement -

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest article

Biden courts Hill leaders, but GOP won’t budge on big deal

WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite sharing pleasantries at the White House, Republican congressional leaders signaled no willingness Wednesday to embrace President Joe Biden’s ideas for...

Virus Outbreak India

Virus Outbreak Indiahttps://apnews.com/article/india-health-coronavirus-pandemic-international-news-3122397d22774e488f5dc3c295f765e3Click to copyhttps://apnews.com/article/india-health-coronavirus-pandemic-international-news-3122397d22774e488f5dc3c295f765e3Click to copy Source link

Santa Fe County to exit regional coalition on national lab

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Santa Fe is the latest county to vote to withdraw from the Regional Coalition of Los Alamos National Laboratory...

Internal emails reveal WHO knew of sex abuse claims in Congo

BENI, Congo (AP) — When Shekinah was working as a nurse’s aide in northeastern Congo in January 2019, she said, a World Health Organization...

Why some gas stations are advertising $9.99 unleaded

If Your Time is shortGas stations will put $9.99 on their signs to indicate that they’re out of gas, not that they’re selling it...