Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Fact Check

Black Lives Matter protest at Iowa Capitol was an “insurrection” like that on Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol.

U.S. Capitol Police push back rioters trying to enter the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. (AP)Source link

“We have encountered the largest surge of migrants (at the southern border) in the last 20 years.”

A migrant from Honduras seeking asylum in the U.S. stands in front of tents at the border crossing on March 1, 2021, in Tijuana,...

No, Ilhan Omar didn’t say that police shouldn’t exist because there are Jewish cops

If Your Time is shortThis claim appears to have originated in a self-described satirical blog post.See the sources for this fact-checkAmid the trial of...

"DMX received COVID vaccine days before heart attack."

The rapper DMX, born Earl Simmons, performs during the BET Hip Hop Awards in Atlanta on Oct. 1, 2011. He died April 9 at...

Chase half flips on pledge not to launch independent bid for governor

Del. Amanda Chase threatened to bolt the Republican party and run for governor as an independent last December when the state GOP decided to...

Says Officer Derek Chauvin’s knee was “not on neck of George Floyd.”

Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo testifies in the trial of former Minneapolis police Officer Derek Chauvin. Chauvin is charged with causing the death of...

US Politics
Latest

Refugee families urge Biden to keep promise to up admissions

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The families of refugees and their supporters, including 124 elected officials, sent President Joe Biden a letter Tuesday urging him...

Michigan man who climbed Capitol wall charged in riot

DETROIT (AP) — A suburban Detroit man who climbed a wall at the U.S. Capitol became the seventh Michigan resident to be charged in...

Bill to lift Idaho smoking age from 18 to 21 fails in House

BOISE, Idaho (AP) — The House on Tuesday rejected legislation banning anyone under 21 from buying cigarettes or electronic smoking products in Idaho has...

Democrats dare GOP to filibuster Asian American hate crimes bill

Senate Minority Whip John Thune (R-S.D.) said that Republicans are considering voting to open debate and offering amendments on the hate crimes measure. Some...

Attorney Lin Wood: Blasting South Carolina’s top Republicans

Lin Wood, the pro-Trump attorney seeking a GOP leadership role in South Carolina, took on two of the state’s most notable Republicans on Tuesday...

LGBTQ

Tom Daley can’t stomach being a Harry Potter fan because of J.K. Rowling / LGBTQ Nation

Dustin Lance Black and husband Tom Daley (l)/J.K. RowlingPhoto: ShutterstockOut Olympic diver Tom Daley said in a recent interview that he can no longer...

How strongly does President Biden support LGBTQ rights? We asked the man who knows best. / LGBTQ Nation

Reggie Greer, the Biden campaign's LGBTQ+ engagement directorPhoto: Biden-Harris CampaignFor LGBTQ people, President Joe Biden’s inauguration meant more than the Democrats taking back the...

Brandi Carlile hid Ellen’s coming out episode on a tape labeled with her boyfriend’s name / LGBTQ Nation

Brandi Carlile performing in 2018Photo: Andy Witchger/via WikipediaOut lesbian musician Brandi Carlisle told Ellen DeGeneres that she recorded Ellen’s famous coming out episode when...

Tech

EXPLAINER: Courtroom technology on display in Chauvin trial

CHICAGO (AP) — The foundation of the case against the former Minneapolis police officer charged with killing George Floyd is a mountain of...

Pinterest establishes legal entity in Turkey to avoid bans

ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The image-sharing platform Pinterest became the latest social media company to agree to set up a legal entity in Turkey...

In shift, oil industry group backs federal price on carbon

Must read

EXPLAINER: Courtroom technology on display in Chauvin trial

CHICAGO (AP) — The foundation of the case against the former Minneapolis police officer charged with killing George Floyd is a mountain of...

Refugee families urge Biden to keep promise to up admissions

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The families of refugees and their supporters, including 124 elected officials, sent President Joe Biden a letter Tuesday urging him...

Soviet cosmonaut made pioneering spaceflight 60 years ago

MOSCOW (AP) — Crushed into the pilot’s seat by heavy G-forces, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin saw flames outside his spacecraft and prepared to die....

Report details new coronavirus variant cases in Alaska

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Health officials have reported a case of a coronavirus variant first detected in South Africa in south-central Alaska.The Alaska case...

WASHINGTON (AP) — The oil and gas industry’s top lobbying group on Thursday endorsed a federal price on carbon dioxide emissions that contribute to global warming, a reversal of longstanding policy that comes as the Biden administration has pledged dramatic steps to address climate change.

The American Petroleum Institute, whose members include ExxonMobil, Chevron and other oil giants, announced the shift ahead of a virtual forum Thursday by the Interior Department as it launches a months-long review of the government’s oil and gas sales.

API also called for fast-tracking commercial deployment of long-sought technology to capture and store carbon emissions, as well as federal regulation of methane emissions from new and existing oil and gas wells, after strongly resisting such regulations proposed by the Obama administration.

“Confronting the challenge of climate change and building a lower-carbon future will require a combination of government policies, industry initiatives and continuous innovation,” API President and CEO Mike Sommers said in a statement.

The reversal comes as President Joe Biden has made tackling climate change a top priority, moving in his first days in office to suspend oil and gas lease sales from federal lands and waters and cancelling the contentious Keystone XL oil sands pipeline from Canada.

Biden said during the campaign he supports “an enforcement mechanism” that targets carbon pollution, and the White House has left open use of a carbon tax to help lower U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has spoken in favor of the idea, telling the Senate Finance Committee, “We cannot solve the climate crisis without effective carbon pricing.”

While industry critics expressed suspicions over the sincerity of the move, Sommers emphasized that oil companies want “market-based solutions” such as a carbon tax or a cap-and-trade policy, rather than “heavy-handed government regulation.″ The oil industry played a key role in the defeat of proposed cap-and-trade legislation in the Senate a decade ago, and its endorsement of a carbon price and other federal action marks a turnaround after years of opposition to federal legislation to address climate change.

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland on Thursday kicked off a broad review of the government’s oil and gas program that could lead to a long-term ban on leases or other steps to discourage drilling and reduce emissions.

Industry representatives and Republican lawmakers have sharply criticized the leasing suspension and warn that widespread job losses are likely in energy-producing states should it become permanent.

But Haaland, the nation’s first Native American cabinet member, said it was time to “take a longer view” just as her ancestors did as they farmed the same land for centuries. “In order to tackle the climate crisis and strengthen our nation’s economy, we must manage our lands and waters and resources, not just across fiscal years, but across generations,” she said.

Ahead of the forum, the White House hosted a videoconference meeting Monday with industry executives, including ExxonMobil and Royal Dutch Shell. The White House said climate adviser Gina McCarthy “made clear that the administration is not fighting the oil and gas sector.”

The meeting came after weeks of friction over moves the administration made to halt new oil leasing on federal lands and to review Trump administration deregulation efforts aimed at helping U.S. oil and gas producers.

During a Thursday press conference, Biden pitched an emerging $3 trillion proposal to upgrade U.S. infrastructure and other needs as an opportunity to create new jobs without making global warming worse.

“We have over 100,000 (oil and gas) wells that are not capped, leaking methane. We can put as many pipefitters and miners to work capping those wells at the same price that they would charge to dig those wells,” Biden said.

The White House declined comment Thursday, but the industry turnaround on carbon pricing was met with doubt among some environmentalists and scorn from congressional Republicans.

“We’re deeply skeptical,” said Joshua Axelrod, senior advocate for the Natural Resources Defense Council.

API has not specified what price should be put on carbon, and a tax alone would not directly address other environmental problems caused by drilling, such as groundwater contamination from fracking or air pollution from oil refineries, Axelrod said.

Louisiana Rep. Garret Graves, top Republican on a special House committee on climate change, said a carbon tax would increase the cost of everything from “food for our families to fuel for our cars,” while costing jobs and harming the economy.

“We need serious American solutions that are based on American innovation … not a cop-out approach to appease the radical left,” Graves said.

Biden has already postponed lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico and western states and suspended leasing in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

Interior officials say the fossil fuel program has failed to consider climate impacts and that irresponsible leasing practices carve up wildlife habitat, threaten Native American cultural and sacred sites and lock up public lands that could be used for recreation or conservation.

After what they call a “fire sale” of public energy reserves under former President Donald Trump, Biden’s team argues that companies still have plenty of undeveloped leases — almost 14 million non-producing acres in western states and more than 9 million acres offshore. Companies also have about 7,700 unused drilling permits — enough for years.

Despite the moratorium on new leases, the Biden administration has continued to issue permits for existing leases, including more than 200 in March, records show.

Environmentalists want that to stop, but an outright drilling ban would raise thorny legal issues. Companies could claim they have the right to extract oil and gas after spending years and millions of dollars to secure leases.

Thirteen states sued the Biden administration Wednesday to end the leasing suspension. The Republican-leaning states, led by Louisiana Attorney General Jeff Landry, seek a court order ending the moratorium imposed by Biden in a Jan. 27 executive order.

Source link

- Advertisement -

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest article

EXPLAINER: Courtroom technology on display in Chauvin trial

CHICAGO (AP) — The foundation of the case against the former Minneapolis police officer charged with killing George Floyd is a mountain of...

Refugee families urge Biden to keep promise to up admissions

SAN DIEGO (AP) — The families of refugees and their supporters, including 124 elected officials, sent President Joe Biden a letter Tuesday urging him...

Soviet cosmonaut made pioneering spaceflight 60 years ago

MOSCOW (AP) — Crushed into the pilot’s seat by heavy G-forces, Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin saw flames outside his spacecraft and prepared to die....

Report details new coronavirus variant cases in Alaska

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Health officials have reported a case of a coronavirus variant first detected in South Africa in south-central Alaska.The Alaska case...

Black Lives Matter protest at Iowa Capitol was an “insurrection” like that on Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol.

U.S. Capitol Police push back rioters trying to enter the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. (AP)Source link