Monday, March 8, 2021

Justice: Technology helped Nebraska courts face pandemic

Must read

Health minister condemns blast at Dutch virus test center

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A blast caused by a “homemade device” smashed windows at a coronavirus testing center in a small Dutch town...

“The National Academy of Medicine points to a significant correlation between marijuana and psychosis, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorders, particularly in teenagers where the...

Marijuana is a Schedule I hallucinogenic substance under the Wisconsin Uniform Controlled Substances Act. Penalties can vary, depending upon the amount or whether it...

Sen. Roy Blunt won’t run for reelection in latest blow to GOP

Blunt, 71, has been a mainstay in Washington politics and the Republican establishment for more than two decades. First elected to the House in...

Georgia attorney general warns against tech support scams

ATLANTA (AP) — As people continue to work and attend school from home because of the coronavirus pandemic, they should be vigilant for scammers...

OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska’s courts have faced a big challenge due to the coronavirus pandemic but continue to serve the public with the use of technology, the state’s chief justice said Thursday.

Nebraska Supreme Court Chief Justice Michael Heavican said the pandemic forced the courts to turn to livestreaming and video chatting services to ensure that proceedings were accessible to the public and people involved in the system.

“We would not have had the ability to rapidly respond to the pandemic if the courts had not built a strong technological foundation over the past decade,” Heavican said in his annual State of the Judiciary address to lawmakers. “As we entered 2020, we were well positioned to transition to distance operations because we had already begun to implement new courtroom technology and programming.”

Heavican said the court’s online payment systems allowed residents to pay traffic tickets and court fines without leaving their homes, and the judiciary also offered an online education system to help judges, lawyers, guardians and others meet continuous education requirements.

New attorneys were sworn into office via online ceremonies across the state, Heavican said. In Dawson County, one judge is broadcasting court proceedings on YouTube.

Heavican said schools and private organizations have hosted jury selection for trials in counties whose courthouses are too small for adequate social distancing to prevent transmission of the coronavirus. He said selection sessions were held at the University of Nebraska-Kearney, Grand Island Central Community College and local K-12 schools and the Lincoln Masonic Lodge.

Heavican also touted the benefits of probation services and problem-solving courts. He said probation costs nearly $2,000 per person, per year, and problem-solving courts costs about $4,000, compared to $41,000 for a person in prison.

“Do the math,” he said. “Probation is the taxpayers’ friend.”

___

This story has been corrected to say that schools and private organizations hosted jury selections for trials, not the trials themselves.

Source link

- Advertisement -

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest article

Health minister condemns blast at Dutch virus test center

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — A blast caused by a “homemade device” smashed windows at a coronavirus testing center in a small Dutch town...

“The National Academy of Medicine points to a significant correlation between marijuana and psychosis, schizophrenia, and other psychotic disorders, particularly in teenagers where the...

Marijuana is a Schedule I hallucinogenic substance under the Wisconsin Uniform Controlled Substances Act. Penalties can vary, depending upon the amount or whether it...

Sen. Roy Blunt won’t run for reelection in latest blow to GOP

Blunt, 71, has been a mainstay in Washington politics and the Republican establishment for more than two decades. First elected to the House in...

Georgia attorney general warns against tech support scams

ATLANTA (AP) — As people continue to work and attend school from home because of the coronavirus pandemic, they should be vigilant for scammers...