Friday, May 14, 2021

Fact Check

San Francisco 49ers QB Trey Lance Signed A $34M Contract. How Much Will Go To California Taxes?

If Your Time is shortAn image shared on Instagram claims that rookie quarterback Trey Lance, who recently signed to the San Francisco 49ers, will...

No, NASCAR hasn’t postponed an upcoming race in Delaware

If Your Time is shortWhat looked like a tweet from a Fox Sports reporter is fake. The real reporter says the race is on.See the...

Conservatives seize on gas crunch to blame Biden, stir base

A graphic calling the East Coast fuel supply crunch “Biden’s Gas Crisis.” A tweet speculating that gas stations running dry was an “INSIDE JOB.”...

“Montana is canceling unemployment because of a workforce shortage.”

Greg Gianforte, Republican candidate for Montana governor, speaks to his supporters after winning the race, in Bozeman, Mont., Tuesday, Nov 3, 2020. (AP)Source link...

No, Amazon doesn’t accept Dogecoin

If Your Time is shortAmazon does not accept cryptocurrency, including Dogecoin, as a form of payment.See the sources for this fact-checkDogecoin, a cryptocurrency based...

So Far, Vaccines Remain Effective Against Variants

SciCheck Digest So far, COVID-19 vaccines have been effective against variants of the coronavirus. Scientists are monitoring the situation carefully, with updated or new vaccines...

US Politics
Latest

‘Doesn’t matter’: Democrats reject GOP’s debt limit demands

Republicans’ official party position “doesn’t matter to me,” said Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.). “We don’t negotiate on the debt ceiling.” Republican leaders retort that they...

Deal reached for ex-White House counsel McGahn’s testimony

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former White House counsel Don McGahn will answer questions in private from the House Judiciary Committee in an apparent resolution of...

Oklahoma governor signs bill to extend early voting by 1 day

OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma Gov. Kevin Stitt signed a bill to expand early, in-person voting by one day during general elections.The bill Stitt...

Stefanik and Roy make their pitches for House GOP No. 3

Roy, a member of the ultra-conservative House Freedom Caucus, joined the leadership race shortly before the forum after hinting at a run earlier this...

GOP dumps defiant Trump critic Cheney from top House post

WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans dumped GOP Rep. Liz Cheney from her House leadership post Wednesday for her persistent repudiation of Donald Trump’s election falsehoods,...

LGBTQ

Is climate change an LGBTQ issue? Let’s find out on this week’s podcast. / LGBTQ Nation

The latest episode of the LGBTQ Nation podcast has arrived and we’re figuring out whether climate change is an LGBTQ issue. On this week’s episode, host...

Ellen fights back tears & explains to Oprah why she’s ending her show / LGBTQ Nation

Ellen had Oprah on her show today. Both hosted massively successful daytime talk shows.Photo: Screenshot/EllenTubeEllen fought back tears as she announced that her show...

The struggles of being Black & queer in the Civil Rights era / LGBTQ Nation

This is the second article in “We Dream On,” a three-part profile of actress, singer, and civil rights icon Donzaleigh Abernathy, the daughter of...

Tech

Strike ends at Oregon Tech as contract deal reached

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. (AP) — The faculty at the Oregon Institute of Technology has come to an agreement on a five-year contract with the...

More support easing vaccine patent rules, but hurdles remain

GENEVA (AP) — Several world leaders Thursday praised the U.S. call to remove patent protections on COVID-19 vaccines to help poor countries obtain shots....

Supreme Court asked to give access to secretive court’s work

Must read

‘Doesn’t matter’: Democrats reject GOP’s debt limit demands

Republicans’ official party position “doesn’t matter to me,” said Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.). “We don’t negotiate on the debt ceiling.” Republican leaders retort that they...

Strike ends at Oregon Tech as contract deal reached

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. (AP) — The faculty at the Oregon Institute of Technology has come to an agreement on a five-year contract with the...

Deal reached for ex-White House counsel McGahn’s testimony

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former White House counsel Don McGahn will answer questions in private from the House Judiciary Committee in an apparent resolution of...

Virus Outbreak India

Virus Outbreak Indiahttps://apnews.com/article/india-health-coronavirus-pandemic-international-news-1101ebd98c144010b0778b133e5418c3Click to copyhttps://apnews.com/article/india-health-coronavirus-pandemic-international-news-1101ebd98c144010b0778b133e5418c3Click to copy Source link

WASHINGTON (AP) — Civil liberties groups are asking the Supreme Court to give the public access to opinions of the secretive court that reviews bulk email collection, warrantless internet searches and other government surveillance programs.

The groups say in an appeal filed with the high court Monday that the public has a constitutional right to see significant opinions of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court. They also argue that federal courts, not the executive branch, should decide when opinions that potentially affect the privacy of millions of Americans should be made public.

The appeal was filed by Theodore Olson on behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union and the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University. Olson is on the Knight institute’s board and was the Bush administration’s top Supreme Court lawyer as the FISA court’s role was expanded after the Sept. 11 attacks.

“You’re talking about judicial decisions here that may affect millions of people. The public needs to know the outlines of what those decisions are and how far they go,” Olson said in an interview with The Associated Press. “Because of my experience with it, I know that government, with the best of intentions, will tend to err on the side of keeping everything secret.”

The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court was established in 1978 to receive applications from the FBI to eavesdrop on people it suspects of being agents of a foreign power, such as potential spies or terrorists. After Sept. 11, Congress expanded the court’s role to consider broad surveillance programs.

In recent decisions, judges ruled that opinions sought by the groups couldn’t be made public, even in censored form, and that they didn’t even have the authority to consider releasing the opinions.

Legislation adopted in 2015 includes a provision that requires the government to consider releasing significant FISA court opinions. But the law doesn’t apply to opinions written before it was enacted and leaves the review process entirely to the executive branch.

The ACLU and Knight institute say the First Amendment’s guarantee of freedom of the press demands greater access.

Source link

- Advertisement -

More articles

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Latest article

‘Doesn’t matter’: Democrats reject GOP’s debt limit demands

Republicans’ official party position “doesn’t matter to me,” said Sen. Chris Murphy (D-Conn.). “We don’t negotiate on the debt ceiling.” Republican leaders retort that they...

Strike ends at Oregon Tech as contract deal reached

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. (AP) — The faculty at the Oregon Institute of Technology has come to an agreement on a five-year contract with the...

Deal reached for ex-White House counsel McGahn’s testimony

WASHINGTON (AP) — Former White House counsel Don McGahn will answer questions in private from the House Judiciary Committee in an apparent resolution of...

Virus Outbreak India

Virus Outbreak Indiahttps://apnews.com/article/india-health-coronavirus-pandemic-international-news-1101ebd98c144010b0778b133e5418c3Click to copyhttps://apnews.com/article/india-health-coronavirus-pandemic-international-news-1101ebd98c144010b0778b133e5418c3Click to copy Source link

Middle school teacher charged with growing marijuana in yard

LELAND, N.C. (AP) — A middle school teacher in North Carolina grew large quantities of marijuana using a greenhouse at her home, authorities said.Catherine...